Susan Wallin Mosey

Susan Wallin Mosey

Susan Wallin Mosey is the administrator at an elder law firm in Aurora, Illinois. When she’s not at work she likes to do genealogy for fun and profit. Storytelling is one of her favorite aspects of genealogy, as can be seen on her blog, Pages from the Ancestry Binders. Another special interest is Amish genealogy. Sue has been doing genealogy as a hobby for about 20 years and has been putting together ancestry binders for others since 2011. She is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists and the National Genealogical Society. Sue lives in Yorkville, Illinois with her husband Gary. Her website can be found at www.ancestrybinders.com and she can be reached at [email protected]

4 Reasons to Research Your Family History

By Susan Wallin Mosey -- “Trees without roots fall over.”—anonymous My husband isn’t interested in genealogy.  He tries hard—but if I go on about it for more than a minute or two, his eyes glaze over.  It seems that people are either very interested in genealogy, or not at all. For those who are interested but who are not natural-born researchers who are also equipped with mad computer skills, endless hours at their disposal to learn the tricks...

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The Grumpy Genealogist: 4 Things That Really Bug Me About Family History Research

By Susan Wallin Mosey I try to be a cheerful and upbeat genealogist—but once in a while, even a real peach of a human being like myself just has to let off some steam.  Lately, four old and familiar issues in particular are really getting on my nerves, genealogically speaking… 1. The missing 1890 census.  Honestly, nearly an entire census lost?  How did this happen?  In all the United States of America in 1921, from sea to...

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Do You Have a Graveyard Kit? Here are the 13 Things I Keep in Mine

By Susan Wallin Mosey Is it weird that I have a graveyard kit?  How else can you go grave hunting in an organized and well-equipped manner?  Mine is stored in a pink bucket with a decal on it.  (I’m a very girly grave hunter.) The bucket contains all the stuff I need for proper gravestone hunting (except a goodly supply of water—never leave home without a goodly supply of water).  The bucket contains: 1. A notebook and...

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Michigan Farm Life in the Great Depression, Part Three

By Susan Wallin Mosey This is part 3 of a 3 part series. Read part 2 here. Excerpts from the childhood of my mother-in-law, Donna Garver Mosey (one of fourteen children), in her own words: Mom did the milking, since Dad didn’t like working with the twelve cows.  We sold the cream but not milk—we didn’t have the cooling required for milk.  The man picked up the cream once a week.  We had real butter at home,...

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Michigan Farm Life in the Great Depression, Part Two

By Susan Wallin Mosey Excerpts from the childhood of my mother-in-law, Donna Garver Mosey, in her own words. This is part 2 of a 3 part series, read part 1 here. At school we had a recess at 10:30 and 2:30, and a one-hour lunch break at noon.  Reading was my favorite subject.  I remember what an awful time I had with long division, though!  I could do short division, but not long…  We played anti-over, where we...

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Michigan Farm Life in the Great Depression, Part One

By Susan Wallin Mosey Excerpts from the childhood of my mother-in-law, Donna Garver Mosey, in her own words: I was the seventh born of fifteen children.  (The fifteenth one, William, had a bad heart and lived only a few days.)  I was born at home, as we all were.  When a new baby was about to be born, we would go outside to play, if we could, in the old corn crib if it was empty.  There...

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More Died From Flu Than From Bullets

By Susan Wallin Mosey More died from flu than from bullets that year… That was the sad truth in America in 1918.  World War I was raging, but so was an influenza epidemic like the world had never seen.  Theodore Peterson—my great uncle Ted—was an engineering student at the University of Nebraska when duty called.  He never made it to Europe. Although this photograph taken at his funeral is heart-wrenching to me, so too are the words...

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Mystery Monday: The Roving Reverend

Even a “man of the cloth” can be a black sheep...  Consider the case of Rev. George Washington Hays. I used to be church historian at the church where I grew up.  One summer I decided to read all the board minutes, starting at the beginning—1858.  Not far into the project, my eyes were drawn to the word “alcoholic”— and I knew I had a story. Rev. Hays was born in Macomb, Illinois in 1837, son of...

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Wayne, Walter, and the Model T

My husband’s great-uncle Wayne Nedry Alwood (1893-1948) had a Model T automobile similar to this one, pictured.  Those puppies could be hard to start, and sometimes a person had to get creative.  But Wayne’s brother-in-law, Walter Garver, discovered a system that worked. Dale Garver, a cousin of my husband’s and a top-notch genealogy researcher, wrote and self-published a book about the Garver family in 2002 which he entitled One Tree in the Garver Family Jungle—Past and Present. ...

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From Yorkshire to America

Mosey, my married name, is an unusual American surname, with no obvious ethnic origin.  But I have learned that it’s English in origin—Yorkshire, to be specific.  My husband’s great-grandfather Robert Mosey was one of his “gateway ancestors”—an ancestor who came from elsewhere to settle in America. Robert Mosey (1821-1884) was born in Bishop Wilton, a village in Yorkshire, England, to Richard Mosey and Sibby Johnson Mosey.  From what I’ve been able to find out about Robert’s early...

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